Stay Injury Free with Hard Training

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Training is good but hard training is better as training consistently is the key to drastic and lasting change to the health, it gives a good performance and well-maintained body composition. There are many things that interrupt the consistency and flow of regular training. The various issues that can lead to short workout at a gym are like work, family, commutes and social gatherings. But ms of the menacing impediments to an undisturbed workout is an injury. The word injury here does not refer to muscle soreness or joint aches which can be called as a passionate love affair with the iron. Here it is referred to as soft tissue injuries to ligaments, tendons, and muscles –both chronic and acute which requires ample amount of rest to heal. While those tissues recover, the rest of your body suffers. The worst part of recovery is that when you take a long time to recover and this leads to storage of fats, lungs return of stasis and muscle is lost.

Well, you will b glad to know that you can strengthen your muscles and joints against various types of injuries by taking few rehabilitative steps before and after the workout. Some of the simple tactics can easily improve performance and enhance recovery. Put few other ways when you can train harder with least chances of recovery.

Before workout, say No to stretching

Stretching is considered as something very cool. But is not just the way it is been taught by generations of the short-sighted sports teachers. But the long-held practice of stagnant stretching has been found in offering no greater protection against injury and is found to decrease performance.

Studies have shown that static stretching before training can negatively bang strength. Several ranges of motion exercises that increase your body temperature generally prepare muscles and joints for the workout ahead.

Dynamic stretching varies but the aim should be to spend 3-5 minutes working in a way of series to increase intensity. Researchers have found that this type of warm up helps in reducing injury risk and improves flexibility and strength.

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Do specific warm up

warm up

It’s time to get specific when you are done with dynamic warm up. After performing few light sets generally in the higher rep range, which helps in increasing the blood flow to muscles and joints but most importantly it helps to regain proper movement pattern ahead for your heavy workout.

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Stretch it out

Timing is everything when we talk about stretching. After work out it is the time to sit and hold some stagnant stretches with the muscles groups you have trained. There is less risk of injury at the time when the muscles are warm and you get a truer stretch. Static stretching post workout also reduces muscle soreness and help in speedy recovery.

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Roll it outroll it out

The professional athlete says that frequent massage is the key to their success but to the consternation of our check they are not wrong. Massage is a healing process that promotes the flow of blood and also keeps connective tissues, muscles, and fascia flexible and healthy. One of the cheap alternatives is a high-density form roller which can rub out pesky knots and release tension in aching muscles, though it is painful in rejuvenating tendons and muscles between workouts.

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Rest

rest

If you have started new workout in the first week you have screaming shoulder, achy back or sore knee. So don’t lift all the weight on the first day as the better approach would be to temper your initial efforts and insist on gradual progression from week to week. Eight-time Mr. Olympia Lee Haney said it best: “Stimulate, don’t annihilate.” So it’s important to let muscles recover between workouts. And if you are not getting sleep for 7 to 9 hours a night, you can compromise the ability of the central nervous system during intense training which might lead to certain kind of injury.

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